skip to Main Content
Menu

How to Find a Counseling Job

The field of counseling offers a wide rang of opportunities in the world of work. A counselor is one who assists, advocates, directs or makes suggests things to someone with some issue that they may be confronted. We have pit together a few tips that will help you find a counseling job. Understand the kinds of jobs that are available in the field of counseling. There is a wide range of positions that require a counselor such as an academic counselor, nutritional counselor, career counselor, basic skills counselor, spiritual counselor, human service counselor, nurse counselor, mental health counselor, administrative counselor, attorney counselor, social service counselor and many others. There are also positions available as counselor assistants in many areas.

• Decide the area of counseling that you would like to pursue. You can do this by doing a little research on the areas that you feel you would be interested in working, See your self in this position and if you like what you have visualized then ask yourself how you feel about working in this area. It is a position that requires that you spend a lot of time interacting with people. Counselors should reflect positive vibes to their clients so it is important that if you are going to work in this field you should really feel good about helping people.

• Check out credential required to hold the position. Most counseling positions would require that one would hold a Masters or Higher in Social Work, Counseling, Nursing, Psychology, Social Service, or some other professional area. If you are interested in becoming an Attorney who is also known as a counselor than a Law Degree is required. There are some jobs for counseling that require a Bachelors Degree while others such as assistant counselor would require less. Some of these positions also require state certification. So all of this needs to be checked out so you will know the requirements and know what you need to do to qualify for the position.

• Analyze your credentials. You know the kinds of positions that a counselor can hold as well as the credentials that the institution is looking for in a person that would choose to hold the position.

• Get ready for the position. Now you have analyzed your credentials and now you can determine if you are ready to apply for a position in counseling. If you have your credentials in order then prepare to look and apply for positions. If you need additional training now is the time to enroll in a college or university program to get your degree. If you need only a couple of courses to complete your class work then you could enroll in the courses; as well as step out on faith and apply for a counseling position, on a promise that you will be finished in a semester.

• Begin your job search. You find a counseling position by looking in web sites of school systems, hospitals, state agencies and universities. You can try Google searches, ask people who you know that work in the area of your choice for a referral, look in News Papers and attend job fairs.

• Be patient. It takes time but with a little patience and perseverance you will get that counseling job and help many people have a better life. The world needs more people like you. So just follow our suggested tips and you will find your dream counseling job.

Acupuncture: Fact and Fiction

There are many myths surrounding the practice of acupuncture. It is not a conventional practice, so many people don’t know what to think.

Many people think that is painful and dangerous because of the use of needles. The needles used in acupuncture treatments are actually very fine. People receiving acupuncture barely feel anything at all when the needles are inserted, much less pain, it is not uncommon for people not to feel the needles at all. The needles used during acupuncture are disposable, so people don’t need to worry about the needles being unclean and unsanitary.

A lot of people are convinced that acupuncture does not actually work. They credit people feeling better to the placebo effect, this means that people simply think that they are feeling better because they believe in the power of the treatment. There have been studies conducted on this, and it has been found that actually does stop pain.

A great deal of people think that acupuncture can only treat pain. Acupuncture can actually help people with sprains/strains, allergies, insomnia, and asthma. It can also help with infertility and drug or alcohol addiction. Many people do not know that acupuncture can actually help with emotional problems as well. This treatment can help people who are dealing with anxiety and depression. It can also help with other things such as, fear, panic attacks, anger, and grief.

Another common misconception is that acupuncture cannot deliver long term benefits. Acupuncture is traditionally used to help strengthen a person’s immune system. Acupuncture treatments can help the immune system function better so that it prevents illnesses such as colds. It also is helpful in reducing a person’s stress, and most people know that too much stress negatively affects the immune system, making someone more susceptible to illness.

There seems to be a lot of people who think of acupuncture as just another medical “fad.” Although acupuncture has not been used in the United States for a very long time (early 1980’s), but it has been used in China for over 3,000 years. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recognized acupuncture as being able to help alleviate over 43 common illnesses.

It is also believed by some that acupuncturists are not real medical professionals. This belief probably comes from people knowing that when acupuncture began in the United States, it was not regulated, but this is not true today. People wishing to become acupuncturists must go through a graduate program lasting 3-4 years focusing on acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine. Acupuncturists obtain their license after passing a series of certification tests, and must keep that license in order to practice. This branch of medicine is regulated the same way others are, in fact, many hospitals have at least one acupuncturists as part of their staff. Some people’s insurance even covers acupuncture treatments.

In Support of the Tomgirl

We are born unique. We are born with innate knowledge of ourselves. We are born with limitless potential.

We are born into a world that has expectations of us. Those expectations vary from culture to culture. One facet of those expectations is being a boy or being a girl. Look like it. Act like it. Pick one. Be one.

Enforcing gender conformity in behavior does nothing to serve the children. What it does is make those around them who buy into the cultural construction of gendered behaviors more comfortable. The decision between making others (read: the adults) more comfortable or cultivating an authentic, fulfilled and happy child should be a no-brainer for all of us.

For many children, the process of being themselves is incidental to all of the other development. Choices are comfortable, easy, seamless and culturally sanctioned. No judgment. It just is. They are diverse and complex in many ways, but not in ways that create dissonance with the culture around gender.

For other children, the process of being themselves takes a more significant place in their development, because their uniqueness is manifesting just as it should although not according to cultural expectations. They are diverse and complex as well, including in ways that require them to challenge culture norms, not because they wish to be activists, simply because they wish to be themselves.

Enter one group of people born girls who love the rough and tumble, trucks, dirt, climbing trees and playing flag football on the playground. Their behaviors are unrelated to who they may ultimately choose as a partner or what body feels right for them, because those are deeper considerations then what they like to do for fun on the playground. These girls are the tomboys. They are encouraged to embrace their toughness wearing t-shirts that say “kick like a girl,” “throw like a girl” and “girl power.”

It is important to remember, it wasn’t always the case that these tomboys were supported. Only a generation or two ago, tomboys were chastised with “unladylike” behavior viewed as a barrier to finding a partner or achieving professional success.

Let’s consider what changed. It wasn’t the behaviors. It was the evolution of our culture into accepting and valuing those so-called boyish behaviors in girls. Although we still occasionally observe the discouragement of these behaviors in girls, the culture has evolved to a point that we admire women like Mia Hamm, Serena and Venus Williams and Lindsay Vonn. (Although, as a culture, we still demonstrate our confliction with strong girls and women by juxtaposing their accomplishments with an image sexualized not on their terms, often seeing media coverage of the “hottest female athletes.”)

Even though their behavior can occasionally make waves, we have grown as a culture to ascribe value to it and to entangle the boy-like behaviors with confidence and success because those behaviors reflect the dominant power structure. We hear sentiments like “that competitive fire will serve her well,” or “her confidence comes through loud and clear.” The evolution into accepting and embracing these behaviors in girls demonstrates that, regardless of the fact that they aren’t traditionally accepted, those behaviors will be useful to them. Therefore, those behaviors are allowed to become part of the evolving conception of what it means to be a girl.

Now enter one group of boys, some who have described themselves or been described as tomgirls. Boys whose innate uniqueness includes sensitivity, creativity, perhaps a soft spot for sequined clothing and playing house. These boys, as part of their innate knowledge of themselves, are engaging in behaviors that are fun for them, bring them happiness and allow them to exist in the world in just a way that feels right. The behaviors they enjoy are separate from whom they may want to date or how they relate to their own bodily boyness despite the mainstream view that these behaviors are indicators of sexuality.

That these behaviors are viewed in our culture as girlish behaviors is irrelevant to them. They are being themselves in the truest sense the best they know how. It is actually the cultural construct of appropriately gendered behaviors that is posing the challenge, not the boys’ behavior. Even though children tend to gravitate toward certain behaviors according to gender, it is important to recognize that that is not always the case.

It is especially significant to examine the fact that our culture has evolved to accept and embrace the tomboys, but heartily resists and discourages the tomgirls. Perhaps when our culture evolves to the point of valuing the traditionally-defined feminine attributes of sensitivity, emotional compassion and creativity, we will find ourselves accepting and embracing the tomgirls. Reveling in their relationships skills, emotional sensitivity and enjoyment of beauty can only come when we, as a culture, recognize these so-called feminine attributes as valuable and useful in the world.

We know that being exactly who we feel we are is an important component to life fulfillment which is why we also take time out of our busy schedule and visit Chicago life coaches. If you have ever struggled with the challenge of trying to be someone you are not to please others or to fit in, you’ve experienced the discomfort that comes with repressing an authentic and innate part of yourself. It is like trying to divert the waters of a river, it requires a vast amount of energy and inevitably results in negative consequences. Ultimately, we observe people spending a significant amount of energy as adults seeking that uniqueness that was chased away when they were children.

As responsible, caring and supportive adults, when considering those brave tomgirls, our focus must be on the wellbeing and happiness of the children, not on the comfort of the culture-reinforcing adults. We need to lead the way in accepting and embracing the authentic manifestations of the tomgirls. We also must challenge the hidden homophobia as misplaced as it is. Our job is to let the tomgirls know we value them and what they bring to this world. We need to actively support them and encourage the cultural evolution toward allowing people to be exactly who they are from the time they are born, instead of chasing their beautiful uniqueness away for the comfort of others. Just as the praise of the tomboy is integrated in our culture, the time is overdue for supporting the tomgirl and all he teaches us.

ANTE NATAL YOGA FOR MUMS TO BE

Are you wanting to stay toned during your pregnancy, learn techniques to help with the breathing during labour or simply allocate precious time for yourself and your baby? Then our restoring fertility Yoga Ante Natal 6 week course is just what you are looking for!! Our classes aim to boost your mind and support your body, helping to make your pregnancy a comfortable and pleasurable experience enabling you with birth and the post-delivery stages.

Yoga is the perfect preparation for labour and the joys that lie ahead. It is hugely beneficial during pregnancy as both a physical and emotional support to help you integrate the different changes that this time brings. The course offers a unique opportunity to connect with your baby and a time for you to tune in to your own personal needs.

”In my own experience,” says Amanda, founder of Go-Yoga and mother of two “yoga plays a very important role in pregnancy, allowing mothers-to-be to remain strong & supple in their bodies and prepared for birth and the duties of motherhood that lie ahead; physically, mentally & spiritually. Practising Ante Natal yoga will create a more flexible body, which will enable you to adapt to various positions in labour practising during this time will also help you to return to your natural shape much quicker and easier after the birth!”

During the 6 week course (please see timetable and rates page for forthcoming course dates & costs) you will be taught a series of specifically designed postures suitable at this time to open the body and increase flexibility, how to relieve aches and pains, to boost circulation and also help with fluid retention. Your posture will improve as you adjust to the changing shape of your body and through increased body and breath awareness you will ease back issues, which are common in pregnancy. The class also aims to eliminate any tension or stress that you may be experiencing and promote a deep sense of relaxation and greater wellbeing. Each Mum-to-be on your course will be at a different fitness level, perhaps a different stage of her pregnancy and you will ALL have varying needs and expectations from your Ante Natal yoga. Your Ante Natal Yoga qualified teacher takes this is all taken into account and each and every one of you is treated as an individual. Please feel free to share with her what it is you are wanting to achieve, listen to your body, practice appropriately and rest whenever you need to.

What to bring?

You don’t need to bring anything with you for the practice. Bring some water to drink after class and if required, a very light snack to keep at bay those hollow hunger pangs so prevalent during this time. Do wear comfortable clothing that you can easily move in and bring some sort of sweater or sweatshirt for your relaxation poses (although blankets are provided). If you have any health concerns or injuries please us know in advance of starting the course. We will also be asking you your due date when you book so that we can keep a track of your pregnancy. In our warm and comfortable studio, Go Yoga Ante-natal classes provide a secure, positive and nurturing environment for all mums-to-be where you can stretch, relax, share and have fun with others experiencing similar body & life changes. Suitable for every level/ability, we encourage you to join us after your first trimester for an experience you will treasure! We look forward to enhancing this wonderful experience for you and offering you the supportive guidance you so deserve at this very special time.

Back To Top